History of Yaz

Yaz was originally approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006, as a once-daily birth control pill, and that same year, Yaz’s approval was expanded to include treatment of the physical and emotional symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a more severe form of PMS that can interfere with a woman’s daily activities. In January 2007, Yaz was additionally indicated for the treatment of moderate acne in women who also want to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

Since 2003, the FDA has issued several warnings to Bayer in regard to its marketing practices for Yaz and Yasmin birth control, forcing the company to correct television and internet advertisements that overstated the benefits of its oral contraceptives, while downplaying their risks. In December 2008, an FDA panel voted in favor of adding a black box warning on the Yaz and Yasmin drug labels to highlight the increased risk of serious cardiovascular events associated with the use of the oral contraceptives among women who smoke.

In October 2011, a study published in the British Medical Journal found that women taking Yaz or Yasmin experienced a two-times increased risk of blood clots, compared to women who used older contraceptives, and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) reported that Yaz and Yasmin ranked second highest in 2011, for the number of adverse events reported to the FDA in connection with the birth control pills.

So far, Bayer has paid billions of dollars to settle thousands of claims brought over potential side effects of Yaz birth control, including a 2015 agreement that required Bayer to set aside close to $57 million in a compensation fund to settle Yaz and Yasmin lawsuits.

Possible Side Effects of Yaz

  • Blood clots
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Deep vein thrombosis
  • Uncontrollable uterine bleeding
  • Kidney disorders
  • Wrongful death
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What is Yaz?

Yaz is a low-dose oral contraceptive pill that contains a combination of ethinyl estradiol, a synthetic estrogen, and drospirenone, a synthetic progestin, and is commonly used to provide effective birth control and prevent unwanted pregnancy. Yaz and a similar birth control pill called Yasmin are manufactured by Bayer Healthcare, and both newer-generation oral contraceptives work by affecting the release of eggs and interfering with the lining of the uterus to protect against pregnancy.

Why are Yaz Lawsuits Filed?

Current Yaz lawsuits allege that Bayer Healthcare:

  • Manufactured and distributed a defective and unreasonably dangerous drug
  • Failed to adequately warn consumers and doctors about the potential risk of Yaz complications
  • Failed to adequately research and test Yaz before putting it on the market
  • Failed to issue a Yaz recall after becoming aware of the potential for the oral contraceptive to cause harmful side effects in users
  • Aggressively marketed Yaz birth control to women
  • Overstated the benefits of Yaz and downplayed its possible risks

Yaz Lawsuit Information

Bayer has so far paid billions of dollars to settle thousands of claims brought over potential side effects of Yaz birth control, including a 2015 agreement that required Bayer to set aside close to $57 million in a compensation fund to settle Yaz and Yasmin lawsuits filed over blood clot-related injuries like heart attack and stroke, and it’s not over yet for the drug maker. There are still thousands of product liability claims pending against Bayer in state and federal courts across the country, on behalf of women who suffered injuries from Yaz and Yasmin birth control. As more information comes to light about the potential side effects of Yaz, additional complaints are expected to be brought in the future.

Reports indicate that more than 80 million women have taken Yaz or Yasmin birth control pills to prevent unwanted pregnancy. If you believe you have been adversely affected by side effects of Yaz, consult an experienced Yaz attorney today for legal help.