History of Testim

Originally developed as a treatment for men diagnosed with hypogonadism and other medical problems causing hormonal deficiencies, testosterone gels like Testim are now widely used among healthy men who have no medical need for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). This is due in large part to aggressive marketing techniques on the part of testosterone drug manufacturers, who have promoted their potentially dangerous products as safe and effective treatments for general symptoms of “low-T,” including decreased sex drive, weight gain, fatigue and lower energy levels. In other words, men with normal testosterone levels and men who have never even had their testosterone levels tested are being prescribed Testim and other low-T treatments to combat the natural signs of aging.

What many of these may don’t know is that testosterone products like Testim offer no proven benefits for healthy men, and may actually expose them to serious and potentially life-threatening side effects, like heart attack, stroke and sudden death. In 2014, a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology found that TRT was associated with double the risk of heart attacks among men over the age of 65, and nearly triple the risk among younger men with pre-existing heart disease. That same year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a drug safety communication indicating that it was “investigating the risk of stroke, heart attack, and death in men taking FDA-approved testosterone products,” and that “none of the FDA-approved testosterone products are approved for use in men with low testosterone levels who lack an associated medical condition.”

Due in large part to aggressive marketing techniques on the part of testosterone drug manufacturers, testosterone gels like Testim are now widely used among healthy men who have no medical need for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT).

Reported Testim Side Effects

  • Stroke
  • Heart attack
  • Blood clots
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Deep vein thrombosis
  • Sudden death
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What is Testim?

Testim is a prescription testosterone gel manufactured by Auxilium Pharmaceuticals and approved by the FDA in 2002. The gel is applied to the shoulders daily to increase testosterone levels among men with hormonal deficiencies caused by medical conditions like endocrine tumors or hypogonadism. Hypogonadism occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough testosterone, which plays an important role in masculine growth and development during puberty, or is unable to produce sperm, or both. AndroGel is currently the leading testosterone gel product on the market in the United States, but Testim is a popular low-T treatment as well, generating more than $200 million in sales per year for Auxilium.

Why Testim Lawsuits Are Being Filed

Testim lawsuits are being brought against Auxilium Pharmaceuticals over allegations that:

  • Auxilium manufactured a dangerous testosterone product.
  • The drug maker knew that the testosterone gel wasn’t safe or beneficial for men without hypogonadism.
  • The drug maker failed to adequately warn about the alleged risk of Testim side effects.
  • The drug maker marketed Testim off-label to healthy men experiencing “low-T” due to advancing
  • The drug maker failed to research the possible risks of Testim treatment.
  • The drug maker placed company profits over patient safety.
  • The drug maker failed to investigate reports of heart problems from Testim.

Testim Lawsuit Information

Several testosterone therapy lawsuits have already been brought against the makers of low-T products like Testim and AndroGel, and product liability lawyers are investigating claims on behalf of men across the country who believe they have suffered strokes, heart attacks, blood clots and other serious injuries from testosterone treatments. All of the TRT lawsuits involve similar claims that the drug manufacturing companies knew about the potential for Testim and other low-T drugs to cause serious side effects in users, yet failed to make these risks known to the public. Instead, the companies continued marketing their testosterone gels, creams, and patches off-label to men with no medical need for the treatment, allegedly exposing them to serious and possibly even life-threatening harm.