What is Actos?

While thousands of Actos bladder cancer cases were included in the $2.4 Billion 2015 settlement, potentially hundreds if not thousands of additional victims have been  diagnosed with bladder cancer since who would not have qualified to be part of the previous settlement and were taking Actos prior to it being linked to bladder cancer. For these victims, additional settlements may be upcoming.

Actos is a Type II Diabetes drug prescribed to help lower blood sugar levels by making the body more sensitive to insulin. Actos, which has the generic name “pioglitazone,” was released by Takeda Pharmaceuticals  in 1999. It was aggressively marketed by partner Eli Lily as a safe, effective Type II Diabetes medication. Over a decade, Actos became on of the most popular diabetes medications of all time, grossing nearly $3.6 billion, which accounted for over a quarter of Takeda’s revenue at the time.

Actos has been linked to an increased risk of bladder cancer. It is believed that Takeda knew of risks associated with the drug before it was released. Lawsuits claim that their failure to warn the public was negligent and dangerous; Takeda’s inaction has impacted many people’s lives.

FDA Warns of Bladder Cancer Risk with Actos

[6-15-2011] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing the public that use of the diabetes medication Actos (pioglitazone) for more than one year may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Information about this risk will be added to the Warnings and Precautions section of the label for pioglitazone-containing medicines. The patient Medication Guide for these medicines will also be revised to include information on the risk of bladder cancer.

[8-4-2011] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing the public that the Agency has approved updated drug labels for the pioglitazone-containing medicines to include safety information that the use of pioglitazone for more than one year may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. FDA previously communicated these labeling changes to the public on June 15, 2011 (Drug Safety Communication).

Takeda Drugs Linked to Bladder Cancer

  • Actos
  • Actoplus Met

  • Actoplus Met XR
  • Duatact

While thousands of Actos bladder cancer cases were included in the $2.4 Billion 2015 settlement, potentially hundreds if not thousands of additional victims have been  diagnosed with bladder cancer since who would not have qualified to be part of the previous settlement.

Actos Lawsuit Information

Thousands of lawsuits have been filed against Takeda Pharmaceuticals due to injurious side effects from the drug Actos and in particular the link to bladder cancer. Lawsuits claim that Takeda manufactured an unsafe product, improperly tested it, concealed clinical trial findings, and failed to warn patients and medical practitioners of the risks associated with their drug.

If you or a loved one suffered bladder cancer during or after use of Actos, you may be entitled to a cash reward settlement. Contact us for a free, no obligation case review.

Common Side Effects of Actos

Common side effects of Actos, Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR or Duatact include:

  • headache,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • stomach upset,
  • diarrhea,
  • weakness,
  • sore throat,
  • muscle pain,
  • weight gain,
  • tooth problems,
  • a metallic taste in the mouth, or
  • sneezing, runny nose, cough, or other signs of a cold.

Let your doctor know if you experience serious side effects ofActos, Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR or Duatact including:

  • new or worsening vision problems (such as blurred vision),
  • bone fracture,
  • reddish-colored urine,
  • urgent need to urinate, or
  • pain while urinating.

Actos Settlement Information

In 2015, Takeda agreed to pay up to $2.4 billion to Actos users who had suffered bladder cancer. However, additional rounds of settlements may be upcoming. There may be thousands of potential victims who used Actos prior to the previous agreement  but were not were diagnosed with bladder cancer until after the settlement deadline. If you or a loved one is a bladder cancer victim that missed out on the first round of settlements it may not be too late. Complete the form on this page to apply now.

In one case alone prior to the settlement, a jury in Louisiana ordered Takeda and Eli Lilly to pay a combined $9 billion in punitive damages after deciding that Takeda had hidden the cancer risks. The judge later reduced the award to $36.8 million. Lilly had once been a co-marketer of the drug.

Get Your Free Case Evaluation

Our case evaluations are free, confidential, and carry no obligation. Call us or fill out the form on this page to get started.
866-391-4464 Fill Out Form
Rate This Service